solidarity instead of solitude

sometimes i think i went back to the philippines just to experience the earthquake and the supertyphoon. two disasters which hit and devastated the visayas region in just a matter of weeks. three, to be specific.

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for what it’s worth, there are some things about natural calamities that bring out something in people, whether good or bad. on one hand, it creates the feeling of uncertainty — that everything could all be taken away before you even know what hit you. it can make people selfish and grab whatever they can get whether they are actually necessary for survival or not.

on the other hand, it arouses a sense of moral obligation innate in most humans. a desire to help; a drive to contribute something — anything — with the hope that somehow it would make a difference in the grand scheme of things. it allows for solidarity instead of solitude in facing the problems at hand. most of all, it makes people human. which makes them realize how short life really is and that happiness lies on having your loved ones around you. alive.

because when calamities hit, the very first things you save are not things. the very first things you would give up your life for in a heartbeat would always be your family and friends.

by now, you’ve probably heard or read a lot of survival stories of the supertyphoon. stories so sad but so inspiring at the same time. the world is full of heroes and heroines, after all.

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i’m glad to have been a part of the bangon leyte humanitarian mission last november 30. i’m so proud of my younger sister and her friends for being active in helping out the victims of the earthquake and the supertyphoon — raising funds, haggling with trucking and shipping companies just to secure the logistics, doing the legwork as well as the planning, and all that other stuff which made their operations successful.

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but, of course, kudos goes to each and every donor who make missions like this possible too.

photo credit: bayong

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